CHHS Senior Law & Policy Analyst Clark Lee Defends his Thesis on Drowsy Driving

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CHHS Senior Law & Policy Analyst Clark J. Lee, JD defended his Master of Public Health thesis (Intention and Willingness to Drive While Drowsy in a Population of University Students in Maryland: An Application of an Extended Theory of Planned Behavior Model) on September 18, 2014 at the University of Maryland School of Public Health in College Park, Md.

For his thesis, Lee conducted a questionnaire-based descriptive study to examine the utility of a model based on constructs from the Theory of Planned Behavior and the Prototype Willingness Model to predict intentions and willingness to engage in drowsy driving behavior in a population of university students in Maryland.

Overall, Lee found that students who reported more favorable attitudes and subjective norm and greater perceived control and willingness in relation to drowsy driving behavior were more likely to report stronger intentions to engage in drowsy driving. Furthermore, students who reported more favorable attitudes and subjective norm in relation to drowsy driving behavior were more likely to report greater willingness to engage in drowsy driving. Perceived behavioral control and willingness were the strongest predictors for intention, while attitudes were a stronger predictor than subjective norm for willingness. Finally, some statistically significant differences in intention and willingness were observed between male and female students, but not between employed and non-employed students.

From these findings, Lee concludes that the extended Theory of Planned Behavior model examined in this study may be highly useful for predicting intentions and willingness to engage in drowsy driving behavior among university students and similar populations. The model examined thus presents a promising theoretical framework for improving the effectiveness of existing drowsy driving prevention efforts targeted at young people and for designing more effective interventions against drowsy driving in young people in the future.

 

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